Barograph

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The new instrument panel, set up so that the NASA NAVTEX and MeteoMan instruments don't block the adjacent panel opening any more.
(2013-03-14 15:53:55 NIKON D7000 with a "18.0-200.0 mm f/3.5-5.6" lens. [f/3.8, 1/60s] ISO 640 Focus 0.60m)
Most boats have a nice chronometer and mechanical barograph that look quite nautical. But as anyone who has used one knows, they need the occasional tap-tap-tap to accurately show the current air pressure and the quaint legend of “Rain” “Change” or “Fair” leave quite a bit to be desired when it comes to weather forecasting. The actual current ambient air pressure (after compensating for diurnal changes) just tells one whether the current weather is a high or a low pressure system; what is important is not so much the actual pressure, but the rate of change of pressure and whether the change is towards higher or lower pressure. For this reason it is really important to measure the rate of rise or fall of the barometer on a regular basis. I've tried to do this on several passages and rarely (well, to be quite frank - never) managed to log regular values with time so that I could see the rate of change. For this reason I opted to add a recording barograph to the electronics on board; of the ones available on the market I liked the one from NASA the most - plus it has the same display as the NAVTEX unit from NASA. NASA Meteoman
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